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My annotated slides from SAA 2019

I presented at Archives*Records 2019 in Austin, on the panel “Means of Production and Selection: Capitalist Frameworks in Archival Contexts“, organized by Elizabeth Lisa Cruces of the University of Houston. My co-panelists were Sarah Carlson of the Harry Ransom Center, Dr. Jamie A. Lee of the University of Arizona, and Margarita Vargas-Betancourt of the University of Florida.

My annotated slides are below. You can also download my slides and those of my co-panelists from the Sched page for our panel.

Bliss Neoliberalism Slides_Page_01

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Archival Neutrality and Archival Authority

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Earlier this week my friend and colleague Hannah Alpert-Abrams published the following article:

Tamy Guberek, Velia Muralles, Hannah Alpert-Abrams; ‘Irreversible’: The Role of Digitization to Repurpose State Records of Repression, International Journal of Transitional Justice

I want to highlight an important (short) passage on page 5, about the establishment of the AHPN as a public archive staffed in part by “former militants, communist and labor union members, civil society activists, and young people with family members who had been detained, tortured or disappeared during the most repressive years of the internal armed conflict.”

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The best movies what I saw in 2018

I saw about a dozen theatrical releases this year, and most of them were pretty good. Here are my favorites, in rough order from least-best to most-best.

11. Suspiria

The original Suspiria is both a campy product of its time (all the new age psychology nonsense) and a visual masterpiece with lots to say about buried history. It’s full of rich subtext about European life in the shadow of fascism and the Holocaust in the 1970s. Guadagnino’s version turns that subtext into text and grounds the story very specifically in Cold War Berlin, but it stops short of the original by not connecting those hidden wartime histories to post-war supernatural violence. Instead we get an audience surrogate whose wife was killed in the Holocaust, which results in some effective but ultimately hollow moments.

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Digital Resources: The Hijuelas Collection

My first (non-blog) publication is now available! I wrote with Matthew Butler of the UT History Department about our Hijuelas digitization project for the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Latin American History. The article is available here (requires an institutional subscription for full access):

http://latinamericanhistory.oxfordre.com/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199366439.001.0001/acrefore-9780199366439-e-618

I have previously written about this project here, and my full workflow documents are available here.

Read about our ongoing project in Puebla, Mexico

Up now on the LLILAS Benson blog, a post about the official launch of the Fondo Real de Cholula digitization project in Puebla, Mexico:

https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/llilas/news/13069

This project will digitize and describe approximately 45 thousand pages of documents from colonial and modern Cholula. In June I traveled with my colleague Dylan Joy to Puebla to deliver equipment and conduct a digitization workshop for the team of three historians, who will carry out the work for the next 9 months.

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